bryankonietzko:

faitherinhicks:

avatar-e:

Aang’s all grown up

I really enjoyed this.

Our portrayals of adult Aang up to this point had always been so serious. We though this was a perfect opportunity to show that deep down he was still the same fun-loving trickster. P.S. Ryu drew both of these, something like 9 years apart!

markruffalo:

Hello All,

It has come to my attention that the Brazilian Candidate for President, Marina Silva, may be against gay marriage. That would put me in direct conflict with her. As you know I have fought for marriage equality in my country and see it as a reflection of the quality of a candidate. I…

vintagemadeinbrazil:

Brigitte Bardot in Búzios (Brazil) photographed by Denis Albanèse, 1962

vintagemadeinbrazil:

Brigitte Bardot in Búzios (Brazil) photographed by Denis Albanèse, 1962

cinephiliabeyond:

Here’s a fantastic interview with Terry Gilliam, “one of the great cinematic fabulists of our time, architect of magnificently maximalist alternate universes, from the surreal dreamscapes of The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus to the dirty, juddering dystopias of Brazil and 12 Monkeys, right back to the alarming, bulbous animations he created for Monty Python. In his 1988 film The Adventures of Baron Munchausen, the titular teller of tall tales puts forward a neat distillation of the Gilliam world-view: ‘Your reality, sir, is lies and balderdash, and I’m delighted to say I have no grasp of it whatsoever.’”

Directing was, says Gilliam, always what he wanted to do. His first solo effort, which came out in 1977, was Jabberwocky, a scatological Dark Ages fantasy that had only the loosest connection to the Lewis Carroll poem (it had a monster in it). He was filming at Shepperton when George Lucas was filming Star Wars at Elstree, and the two productions shared crew. “I remember our crew would go some days and work on Star Wars, and come back saying, ‘Jabberwocky’s going to be great; Star Wars, the director doesn’t know what he’s doing.’ They were so proud to be working on Jabberwocky, they wore T-shirts with the name on, until Star Wars came out. Off went the Jabberwocky T-shirts, on with the Star Wars T-shirts.”

The fickleness of Hollywood is a subject you feel Gilliam could expound upon ad infinitum. His struggles with the “middle-range bureaucrats” who run the place have become the stuff of legend, because Gilliam has never been afraid to engage them in battle. In 1985, Universal producer Sid Sheinberg asked him to hack away 50 minutes from Brazil and give it a happy ending. In response, Gilliam took out a full-page advertisement in the trade paper, Variety, reading: “Dear Sid Sheinberg, When are you going to release my movie, Brazil?” Then there was the episode in 2006 when, aggrieved at the lack of marketing support for his film, Tideland, Gilliam wandered the streets wearing a cardboard placard reading: “Studio-less film maker – Family to support – Will direct for food.”

Gilliam used to jet over to Los Angeles to pitch his stories to the studios, but not any more. “I’ve cut my ties, I don’t even have an agent out there,” he says. “I used to go out there with my begging bowl in my hands. And you’d go to these meetings with these executives and you’d get this preamble of five minutes of how much they’ve loved all my films, when they were kids, Time Bandits, it goes on and on. And then you present the new film and they say, ‘Well, I don’t know, I don’t quite get this one.’ And I have to tell them,” he says, wagging his finger, “ Nobody got those other ones either!” Gilliam is still a member of the Academy, and submitted votes for this year’s Oscars: “I just vote for my friends, or do it whimsically, or out of spite in some cases.” —Terry Gilliam interview: ‘If I had stayed in America, I’d be throwing bombs’


For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

//

cinephiliabeyond:

Here’s a fantastic interview with Terry Gilliam, “one of the great cinematic fabulists of our time, architect of magnificently maximalist alternate universes, from the surreal dreamscapes of The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus to the dirty, juddering dystopias of Brazil and 12 Monkeys, right back to the alarming, bulbous animations he created for Monty Python. In his 1988 film The Adventures of Baron Munchausen, the titular teller of tall tales puts forward a neat distillation of the Gilliam world-view: ‘Your reality, sir, is lies and balderdash, and I’m delighted to say I have no grasp of it whatsoever.’”

Directing was, says Gilliam, always what he wanted to do. His first solo effort, which came out in 1977, was Jabberwocky, a scatological Dark Ages fantasy that had only the loosest connection to the Lewis Carroll poem (it had a monster in it). He was filming at Shepperton when George Lucas was filming Star Wars at Elstree, and the two productions shared crew. “I remember our crew would go some days and work on Star Wars, and come back saying, ‘Jabberwocky’s going to be great; Star Wars, the director doesn’t know what he’s doing.’ They were so proud to be working on Jabberwocky, they wore T-shirts with the name on, until Star Wars came out. Off went the Jabberwocky T-shirts, on with the Star Wars T-shirts.”

The fickleness of Hollywood is a subject you feel Gilliam could expound upon ad infinitum. His struggles with the “middle-range bureaucrats” who run the place have become the stuff of legend, because Gilliam has never been afraid to engage them in battle. In 1985, Universal producer Sid Sheinberg asked him to hack away 50 minutes from Brazil and give it a happy ending. In response, Gilliam took out a full-page advertisement in the trade paper, Variety, reading: “Dear Sid Sheinberg, When are you going to release my movie, Brazil?” Then there was the episode in 2006 when, aggrieved at the lack of marketing support for his film, Tideland, Gilliam wandered the streets wearing a cardboard placard reading: “Studio-less film maker – Family to support – Will direct for food.”

Gilliam used to jet over to Los Angeles to pitch his stories to the studios, but not any more. “I’ve cut my ties, I don’t even have an agent out there,” he says. “I used to go out there with my begging bowl in my hands. And you’d go to these meetings with these executives and you’d get this preamble of five minutes of how much they’ve loved all my films, when they were kids, Time Bandits, it goes on and on. And then you present the new film and they say, ‘Well, I don’t know, I don’t quite get this one.’ And I have to tell them,” he says, wagging his finger, “ Nobody got those other ones either!” Gilliam is still a member of the Academy, and submitted votes for this year’s Oscars: “I just vote for my friends, or do it whimsically, or out of spite in some cases.” —Terry Gilliam interview: ‘If I had stayed in America, I’d be throwing bombs’

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

fuckyeahdirectors:

6 directors are redefining what it is to be a woman in Hollywood | Sam Taylor-Johnson, Jennifer Yuh Nelson, Ava DuVernay, Sarah Polley, Lisa Cholodenko and Lana Wachowski for The New York Times

fuckyeahdirectors:

6 directors are redefining what it is to be a woman in Hollywood | Sam Taylor-Johnson, Jennifer Yuh Nelson, Ava DuVernay, Sarah Polley, Lisa Cholodenko and Lana Wachowski for The New York Times

Errol Flynn in The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938)

Errol Flynn in The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938)

Judex (1963)
StageFright (1987)
Danger 5 (2011)

Samurai Champloo: Intro
Odete Lara em Noite Vazia (1964), de Walter Hugo Khouri

Odete Lara em Noite Vazia (1964), de Walter Hugo Khouri