Odete Lara em Noite Vazia (1964), de Walter Hugo Khouri

Odete Lara em Noite Vazia (1964), de Walter Hugo Khouri

Still from The Twelve Chairs (1970), written and directed by Mel Brooks.

Still from The Twelve Chairs (1970), written and directed by Mel Brooks.

michelsloup:

Recife Frio (2009)
Direção: Kleber Mendonça Filho 

michelsloup:

Recife Frio (2009)

Direção: Kleber Mendonça Filho 

A Música do Cangaço (1984), projeto de Aluísio Falcão com o Estúdio Eldorado, resgata o cancioneiro regional associado ao período final do cangaço. O disco conta com depoimentos dos ex-cangaceiros Volta-Seca e Sila, que relata em detalhes o massacre de Angicos, em que morreu Lampião.Há gravações de artistas como Luiz Gonzaga, Antônio Nóbrega e Sérgio Ricardo. 

A Música do Cangaço (1984), projeto de Aluísio Falcão com o Estúdio Eldorado, resgata o cancioneiro regional associado ao período final do cangaço. O disco conta com depoimentos dos ex-cangaceiros Volta-Seca e Sila, que relata em detalhes o massacre de Angicos, em que morreu Lampião.
Há gravações de artistas como Luiz Gonzaga, Antônio Nóbrega e Sérgio Ricardo. 

fuckyeahdirectors:

Leslie Caron, Gene Kelly and Vincente Minnelli on-set of An American in Paris (1951)

fuckyeahdirectors:

Leslie Caron, Gene Kelly and Vincente Minnelli on-set of An American in Paris (1951)

cinephiliabeyond:

A 26-year-old Alfred Hitchcock shooting The Lodger  (1927) with assistant director Alma Reville, soon to be his wife. Open Culture recently added Hitchcock’s third feature in their collection of 23 Hitchcock movies online.

For a film that came out decades before Vertigo and Rear Window, The Lodger has just about all of Hitchcock’s cinematic ticks. A fetishistic obsession with blondes? Check. An unsettling mingling of sex and death? Check. A man wrongly accused? Check. The only thing it really lacks is a national landmark as the backdrop of a showy action set piece. On the other hand, The Lodger feels decidedly German. The claustrophobic lighting, the grotesque shadows and the generally morbid storyline all would be perfectly at home at Universum Film AG. In fact, The Lodger, in terms of story, tone and looks, feels like a cinematic cousin to Fritz Lang’s 1931 early sound masterpiece M. Of course, Hitchcock was just a young director in 1927. And like many young filmmakers, he had a hard time with his producers. While the book leaves it ambiguous whether or not the lodger is the killer, the handlers of the movie’s star Ivor Novello couldn’t possibly have the actor play a villain and demanded a change to the ending. When Hitch turned in the final movie, Michael Balcon, the movie’s main producer, was unimpressed and almost shelved the flick, and, with it, Hitchcock’s career. But after a little bit of tinkering, the movie was finally released. And when The Lodger became a huge box office hit, Hitchcock’s career was assured. —Jonathan Crow, Alfred Hitchcock’s first truly ‘Hitchcockian’ movie (1927)


The following documentary was broadcast in two parts in 1999: Alfred, the Great  and Alfred, the Auteur, and focuses on the important parts of Hitchcock’s career. It starts off with his early life and work experience at the German studio UFA, which moves into his first features such as The Lodger, Sabotage, and The 39 Steps. It then moves into his initial Hollywood work, with classics such as Rebecca  and Rope. There’s also a look into his failed production company Transatlantic Pictures, who made Rope  and Under Capricorn.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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cinephiliabeyond:

A 26-year-old Alfred Hitchcock shooting The Lodger  (1927) with assistant director Alma Reville, soon to be his wife. Open Culture recently added Hitchcock’s third feature in their collection of 23 Hitchcock movies online.

For a film that came out decades before Vertigo and Rear Window, The Lodger has just about all of Hitchcock’s cinematic ticks. A fetishistic obsession with blondes? Check. An unsettling mingling of sex and death? Check. A man wrongly accused? Check. The only thing it really lacks is a national landmark as the backdrop of a showy action set piece. On the other hand, The Lodger feels decidedly German. The claustrophobic lighting, the grotesque shadows and the generally morbid storyline all would be perfectly at home at Universum Film AG. In fact, The Lodger, in terms of story, tone and looks, feels like a cinematic cousin to Fritz Lang’s 1931 early sound masterpiece M. Of course, Hitchcock was just a young director in 1927. And like many young filmmakers, he had a hard time with his producers. While the book leaves it ambiguous whether or not the lodger is the killer, the handlers of the movie’s star Ivor Novello couldn’t possibly have the actor play a villain and demanded a change to the ending. When Hitch turned in the final movie, Michael Balcon, the movie’s main producer, was unimpressed and almost shelved the flick, and, with it, Hitchcock’s career. But after a little bit of tinkering, the movie was finally released. And when The Lodger became a huge box office hit, Hitchcock’s career was assured. —Jonathan Crow, Alfred Hitchcock’s first truly ‘Hitchcockian’ movie (1927)

The following documentary was broadcast in two parts in 1999: Alfred, the Great  and Alfred, the Auteur, and focuses on the important parts of Hitchcock’s career. It starts off with his early life and work experience at the German studio UFA, which moves into his first features such as The Lodger, Sabotage, and The 39 Steps. It then moves into his initial Hollywood work, with classics such as Rebecca  and Rope. There’s also a look into his failed production company Transatlantic Pictures, who made Rope  and Under Capricorn.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

Mauricio de Sousa em As Aventuras da Turma da Mônica (1982)

Mauricio de Sousa em As Aventuras da Turma da Mônica (1982)

rosie-girl:

Elementary, Dear Data.  One of my favorite Star Trek The Next Generation episodes.  Data playing Holmes and Geordie playing Watson with a truly intelligent Moriarty :)

rosie-girl:

Elementary, Dear Data.  One of my favorite Star Trek The Next Generation episodes.  Data playing Holmes and Geordie playing Watson with a truly intelligent Moriarty :)

cinephiliabeyond:

Japanese posters for Akira Kurosawa’s Ran, courtesy of kurosawa-akira. Ran was Kurosawa’s last epic. With a budget of $12 million, it was the most expensive Japanese film ever produced up to that time. Here’s the original press kit and other documents for your reading and learning pleasure.

Chris Marker’s documentary A.K.  (1985) is an epic — a portrait of Kurosawa during the making of his most ambitious and expensive picture. You see the Sensei director in front of JCBs, great earth-moving machines… You see massive sets, hundreds of extras, the Plains of Gotenba…

In 2005, the Criterion Collection went interviewing director Sidney Lumet (12 Angry Men, Network…) about Akira Kurosawa’s Ran (1985) — as the film was getting released on video at that time. In these 12-min long interview, the American director shares some insightful comments, whether it’s on the film — pointing out subtle details, giving us the perfect opportunity to re-watch it — or, on Akira Kurosawa himself — Lumet did meet the Japanese filmmaker, saying he’s “the Beethoven of movie directors.”

Among other things, Lumet talks about the visual style of Kurosawa, how he didn’t use close-ups on Ran, how the movie looks like a painting, ow he directed actors to get something surrealist, over-the-top. Lumet also notices the western sounds of the score, explaining the “western orientation of Kurosawa’s work,” only to conclude on the main (and dark) themes of the film.Wildgrounds

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

cinephiliabeyond:

Paul Cronin's The Sticking Place have a wonderful section on Werner Herzog: an early essay about Herzog by Gideon Bachmann here and an interview by Lawrence O’Toole here. Here for a 1977 article from the New York Times and here for an essay by Chris Wahl. A solid summary of Herzog’s life and work from Harper’s Magazine is here and an interview from the Directors Guild of America here.  Amos Vogel’s 1971 article on Fata Morgana is here and his 1981 article on the same film is here. Here for Vogel’s 1977 article about Herzog and here for his 1992 review of Herzog’s Lessons of Darkness. A 2005 profile from The New Yorker here. Roger Ebert’s 1979 interview here. Herzog’s essay On the Absolute, the Sublime, and Ecstatic Truth here.
A great 1982 South Bank Show portrait of Werner Herzog broadcast as Fitzcarraldo, a film I think Eisenstein would have been proud to call his own, was nearing its screening at Cannes. When I interviewed the director a decade or so ago, he insisted to me that he was ‘clinically sane’ but appreciated the journalists (‘stooges,’ he called them) who portrayed him as mad because he felt protected by the scary reputation. —Darren D’Addario

For more, see our archive under the tag, Werner Herzog.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:
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cinephiliabeyond:

Paul Cronin's The Sticking Place have a wonderful section on Werner Herzog: an early essay about Herzog by Gideon Bachmann here and an interview by Lawrence O’Toole here. Here for a 1977 article from the New York Times and here for an essay by Chris Wahl. A solid summary of Herzog’s life and work from Harper’s Magazine is here and an interview from the Directors Guild of America here.  Amos Vogel’s 1971 article on Fata Morgana is here and his 1981 article on the same film is here. Here for Vogel’s 1977 article about Herzog and here for his 1992 review of Herzog’s Lessons of Darkness. A 2005 profile from The New Yorker here. Roger Ebert’s 1979 interview here. Herzog’s essay On the Absolute, the Sublime, and Ecstatic Truth here.

A great 1982 South Bank Show portrait of Werner Herzog broadcast as Fitzcarraldo, a film I think Eisenstein would have been proud to call his own, was nearing its screening at Cannes. When I interviewed the director a decade or so ago, he insisted to me that he was ‘clinically sane’ but appreciated the journalists (‘stooges,’ he called them) who portrayed him as mad because he felt protected by the scary reputation. —Darren D’Addario

For more, see our archive under the tag, Werner Herzog.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

gabrielledelilah:

Frank Zappa and Claudia Cardinale by Richard Averdon, 1967

gabrielledelilah:

Frank Zappa and Claudia Cardinale by Richard Averdon, 1967

movieposteroftheday:

1970s French re-release grande for THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY (Sergio Leone, Italy, 1966)
Artist: Jean Mascii (1926-2003) [see also]
Poster source: Heritage Auctions
R.I.P. Eli Wallach (1915-2014)

movieposteroftheday:

1970s French re-release grande for THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY (Sergio Leone, Italy, 1966)

Artist: Jean Mascii (1926-2003) [see also]

Poster source: Heritage Auctions

R.I.P. Eli Wallach (1915-2014)

Capas e quartas-capas das edições da trilha sonora de A Noite do Espantalho (1974), filme escrito, dirigido e musicado por Sérgio Ricardo.